About

Purpose

Although many overtly racist policies have been repealed since Confederation, their legacy continues to affect Indigenous peoples’ health and well-being.
Created by BUILD. Films and Networked Health, with funding and support from the Canadian Medical Association, this film is shining a light on the impacts of colonialism and systemic racism.

The Unforgotten features the stories of Inuit, Métis and First Nations peoples who have been forcibly sterilized, abused in hospital, forced from their homes and land and left dying in emergency department waiting rooms.

Accompanied by educational resources, this film was created to raise awareness, incite reflection and spark conversations about how to make meaningful change happen in health care.

Newspaper clippings with Sterilize heading
Drawn image of children at desk
Woman picking flowers in a field
About The Unforgotten

A film exploring the health and well-being of Inuit, Métis and First Nations peoples across five stages of life: birth, childhood, adolescence, adulthood and elderhood.

Featuring stories rich in visuals, poetry and music, the anthology uncovers instances of systemic racism, the impacts of colonialism and the ongoing trauma experienced by Indigenous peoples in the Canadian health care system.

Watch the film
Behind the CMA’s support for this film

These are experiences that need to be heard, understood and actioned.

This film speaks to a wide audience, including the physician community, in a way that is impactful and educational. We hope this film will increase awareness and knowledge about the inequities Indigenous peoples face and inspire compassion and conversations about how to close the gap in health outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations.

We see this as an opportunity for the Canadian Medical Association to help drive ongoing dialogue within the health care community about larger efforts toward reconciliation.

"The Unforgotten is the title of a song by Iskwē, who graciously allowed us to adapt it for use as the title of this film; it's both a statement and an invitation. A statement to acknowledge the history of Canada purposely “forgetting” stories that challenge the myth of a tolerant and egalitarian society, and an invitation to start listening so the stories are now heard. To unforget something requires a purposeful effort. It requires one to leave oneself open to new realities, new creation stories, a new mythology. This is needed to rebuild relationships. We must unforget."

— Dr. Ewan Affleck, executive producer

"This film provides an impetus to do better. We must do better. We must move away from the devastating impacts of systemic racism and genocidal approaches that we, as Indigenous Peoples, have endured, for far too long."

— Aluki Kotierk, Knowledge holder

Recognition

Nominee Research Yorkton Film Festival 2021